Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th International Conference and Exhibition on Lasers, Optics & Photonics Atlanta, Georgia , USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Vladislav E Bougrov

Director of School of Photonics ITMO University Russia

Keynote: Wide band-gap semiconductor materials with low defect density for future high-power nanophotonics and electronics

Time : 08:55-09:20

OMICS International Optics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Vladislav E Bougrov photo
Biography:

Vladislav E Bougrov is the Director of School of Photonics and Head of Chair of Light Technologies and Optoelectronics at the ITMO University, St. Petersburg, Russia. He has obtained his Master’s degree in Optoelectronics from Department of Optoelectronics, PhD in 1999 and DSc in Physics in 2013 from Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia. He is the author of more than 60 papers in reputed journals, inventor of more than 100 patent applications, including more than 30 granted patents and has extensive experience with dynamic management of growing international start-up companies. He is the founder of Optogan.

Abstract:

Wide band-gap (WBG) semiconductor material scientific and technological research has greatly intensified over the last decade due to their tremendous potential for electricity savings offered by WBG semiconductor materials and devices for solid state lighting (SSL) and power electronics (PE) for grid-scale applications. Replacement of today’s light sources with nitride-based SSL offers 10-15% electrical energy savings potential, however, requiring breakthroughs in materials, devices and lighting systems. Similarly, grid-scale implementation of WBG PE offers 10% electrical energy savings through the reduction in power conversion losses in the grid, requiring development of the science and technology of WBG PE devices. To address this opportunity, our group focused mainly on two WBG materials systems: III-nitrides and β-Ga2O3. One of the major problems during WBG material and device development is high defect density typically observed in WBG materials. Nano-photonic and electronic devices fabricated from high dislocation density layers demonstrate poorer performance than those made from relatively defect-free layers. Light emitting diode (LED)-based SSL is usually realized by combining blue III-nitride LED light with yellow and red light from down-converting phosphors. The typical LED efficiency is on the order of 100–140 lm/W at low currents, and it falls with injected current density due to the droop phenomenon. To assess possible progress, it suffices to know that the efficiency limit for LED is about 300lm/W. One of the main reasons for efficiency droop is an extremely high density of threading dislocations (TDs). High density of TDs results from the initial inevitable step of epitaxial growth of GaN layer on foreign substrates possessing high lattice mismatch, e.g., sapphire or silicon carbide substrates. We develop a general methodology for the reduction of TD density in III-nitride layers fabricated in (0001) polar growth orientation. We present the results on theoretical and experimental studies of threading dislocations (TDs) behavior in III-nitride layers grown in polar orientation. TDs are defects formed during epitaxial growth of layered electronic and optoelectronic materials. In PE, the full potential of WBG materials can only be realized by using single crystal substrates. Although some commercial devices have been demonstrated, the optimum material/device structure for the MW power applications has not yet been defined. β-Ga2O3 due to its reasonable carrier mobility and extraordinary high dielectric breakdown strength, offers clear advantages compared both to Si-based devices and other WBG materials. β-Ga2O3 is the only stable polymorph of gallium oxide through the whole temperature range till the melting point. We report flat-surface β-Ga2O3 single crystals produced by free crystallization of Ga2O3 melt.

OMICS International Optics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ortwin Hess photo
Biography:

Ortwin Hess is currently the Leverhulme Chair in the Blackett Laboratory (Department of Physics) at Imperial College London. He has obtained his PhD degree from the Technical University of Berlin (Germany) in 1993 and the Habilitation from the University of Stuttgart in 1997. From 2003 to 2010, he was a Professor at the University of Surrey (Guildford, UK) and a Visiting Professor at Stanford University (1997/98) and at the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (1999/2000). He is the author of more than 170 journal papers, 3 books and 23 book chapters and has presented 15 plenary talks and over 90 invited talks at international conferences.

Abstract:

Recent progress in nanophotonics and metamaterials physics is now allowing us to ‘look inside the wavelength’ and exploit active nanoplasmonics and metamaterials as a new route to quantum many-body optics on the nanoscale. At the same time, lasers have become smaller and smaller, reaching with the demonstration of plasmonic nanolasing, scales much smaller than the wavelength of the light they emit. Here we discuss recent progress in the study of quantum emitters and quantum gain in nanoplasmonic systems and deliberate on approaches. We combine classical and quantum many-body theory and simulation to describe and model the spatio-temporal dynamics of the optical near field and plasmon polaritons coupled with quantum emitters in nano-plasmonic cavities. We reveal the mechanisms that recently have experimentally allow us to reach the strong coupling regime at room temperature and in ambient conditions. Moreover, it will be demonstrated that applying the nanoplasmonic stopped-light lasing principle to surface- plasmon polaritons (SPP) allows the realization of trapped/condensed non-equilibrium surface-plasmon polaritons at stopped-light singularities, providing an entry point to SPP-condensation.

OMICS International Optics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker G S Sokolovskii photo
Biography:

G S Sokolovskii is the Leading Research Fellow at Ioffe Institute (St.Petersburg, Russia). He has graduated from the St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University ‘LETI’ (St. Petersburg, Russia) in 1994 (MSc) and has received his PhD and Doctor of Science (Habilitation) degrees from Ioffe Institute (1998 and 2010, respectively). His main research interests include Laser Physics, Nanophotonics and Physics of Semiconductors. He has authored and co-authored over 200 peer-reviewed publications and 10 patents on these topics. He is the Professor of the Russian Academy of Sciences and serves as the Vice-chair and Treasurer of the St. Petersburg Chapter of IEEE Photonics Society.

Abstract:

Frequency doubling of the infrared laser light based on the generation of new laser wavelengths via material’s nonlinearity is one of the most attractive ways for the realization of compact visible laser sources with a number of cutting-edge applications, which are supported both by the market and the technology via availability of compact and highly-efficient infrared laser diodes. However, for efficient conversion, or second harmonic generation, both photon and momentum conservation are to be achieved simultaneously. The last requirement (also called “phase-matching” constraint) is difficult to achieve due to dispersion of the refractive index in the nonlinear crystal. To date, by far the most commonly used approach for the phase-matching between interacting waves is the periodical poling (or “quasi-phase-matching”) of the ferroelectric nonlinear crystals by periodically reversing the crystals polarization under large electric field. In this talk, we provide a fundamental generalization of quasi-phase-matching based on the multi-mode matching and fractional-order poling techniques. With these techniques, an order-of-magnitude increase in the wavelength tunability range for frequency conversion from a single crystal is enabled, thus offering a preferred way for the realization of a compact and spectrally-flexible laser sources in the visible wavelength range.

Keynote Forum

Dorota A Pawlak

Professor Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Poland

Keynote: Title: Plasmonic materials/metamaterials by crystal growth

Time : 10:10-10:35

OMICS International Optics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dorota A Pawlak photo
Biography:

Dorota A Pawlak is a Professor at the Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (ITME) of Warsaw, and at the Centre of New Technologies (CeNT), University of Warsaw in Poland. She is currently the Head of the Department of Functional Materials at ITME and Leader of the Laboratory of Materials Technology at CeNT. Her research is linked to technology development for the manufacturing of new functional materials, such as plasmonic materials, metamaterials, materials with special electromagnetic properties and materials for solar energy conversion. She currently focuses on bottom-up methods such as directional solidification and crystallization, nanoparticles direct doping method and associated research.

 

Abstract:

Professor Jan Czochralski investigated the crystallization velocity of metals from the melt, for this he developed a crystallization method in 1916, published in 1918, which later has been used by Teal and Little in Bell Laboratories to grow first germanium crystal. This good quality crystal enabled formation of first p-n junction and design of the first point-contact transistor. J Bardeed, W H Brattain and W B Shockley for the discovery got the Nobel Prize in physics in 1956. Currently, the Czochralski method is the most widely used crystal growth technique and Czochralski is often called the father of electronics. Recently it has been proposed to utilize crystal growth methods for manufacturing of novel photonic materials including plasmonic materials and metamaterials. Utilizing eutectic directional solidification such pivotal for metamaterials structures were demonstrated as split-ring resonators. Nanoplasmonic materials with tunable localized surface plasmon resonance and enhanced photoluminescence were demonstrated with an example of Bi2O3-Ag eutectic. Typical for eutectics geometry is lamellar or rod-like, and in this type of structures subwavelength transmission has been demonstrated, and hyperbolic dispersion predicted. Even growth of lamellar eutectics with a rounded structure has been demonstrated resembling the metamaterial hyperlens. Recently, a new approach demonstrated combining the eutectic crystallization with photonic crystal templates, thus enabling a two orders of-structuring of the material. Also, directional solidification has been applied for a novel method of manufacturing dielectric bulk materials doped with various nanoparticles called nanoparticle direct doping. With this method nanoparticles enter the dielectric matrix without a chemical reaction, thus the method enables doping the matrices with nanoparticles or various chemical composition, nanoparticles with specific shape, as well as co-doping with other chemical elements i.e. as rare earth ions. Utilizing crystal growth application for manufacturing of novel photonic composites may enable their easy application

  • Workshop
Location: Chattahoochee-B

Session Introduction

Douglas R McCarter

Vice-President and Co-Founder, McCarter Machine & Technology Inc. USA

Title: Understanding Silicon for Optics
Speaker
Biography:

Douglas R McCarter, Drhc, is the Technical Integrator of McCarter Machine & Technology Inc., founded in 1981. His patented and proprietary silicon processes achievements were documented by published technical papers and over 50 oral presentations. In turn, he has won many awards, mentioned in Forbes.com, Kiplinger Letter, Entrepenuer.com, NASA Tech Briefs, Missile Defense Briefs Open and Classified, and recognized as the current world expert in precision silicon components. He has served as member of Editorial Staff of Advanced Optical Technology, in Munich Germany since 2012. In 2016, Dr. Babin, Congressman District 37 and Leader of NASA Funding, endorsed him, and the staffers are working directly with backing of the development of McCarter Silicon Space Systems. In addition to over 3000 hours of Technical Schools, he has been directly mentored by the late Frank Anthony, Bell Labs and Roger Paquin Perk & Elmer, a retired Materials Expert.

Abstract:

Most high energy lasers use single crystal silicon for the mirrors only, up to 460 mm diameter. McCarter has developed an all single crystal silicon telescope model that incorporates modular single crystal silicon mirrors with 39NiFe inserts for attachment, as well as single crystal silicon support structures to provide a system that is athermal. The telescope concept can scale up to meter class, as demonstrated for the SBL-IFX space based meter class laser. Single crystal silicon, a material that behaves isotropically; and McCarter processing methods are critical in providing 80-325 mm missile interceptor telescopes that will not blur, creep or jitter during thermal and/or mechanical loads. SCiSi is the only material that can handle endo- and exo-thermal missions. After two decades of prototyping and third party testing McCarter has created a TRL-6 solution to overcome single crystal silicon size and complexity restraints. These manufacturing processes are comprised of single crystal silicon; glass frit bonding and metal insert attachment. McCarter silicon mirrors are successfully fielded in ABL, THEL, MTHEL, CRAM200, INSS and others. After building EKV mirrors during MDA SBIR B044-095-1205, “define and demonstrate a beryllium substitute material for GMD applications”, McCarter was contracted by WSMR to replace their cooled molybdenum mirrors with single crystal silicon mirrors incorporating our processing technology. Molybdenum is a heritage material that, like beryllium, is in-efficient and extremely expensive. The use of McCarter’s modular approach enabled a compact HEL system without the need for any coolers. This contract for WSMR, as well as another with MZA, Albuquerque NM with modular single crystal silicon helicopter HEL mirrors raised the technical readiness level to 6. In addition to detecting and deterring hostile missiles this same technology will mitigate space trash and protect against asteroids of all sizes. 

  • Young Researchers Forum (YRF)
Location: Chattahoochee-B

Session Introduction

Morad Eghbal

Morad Eghbal, University of Texas, USA

Title: Tandem modulation for W-band OCDMA radio-over-fiber system

Time : 17:05-17:20

Speaker
Biography:

Morad Eghbal is currently a PhD student conducting research in Microwave Photonics under the supervision of Dr. Mehdi Shadaram at the Photonics Research Lab at The University of Texas at San Antonio. His research interests are photonic generation of millimeter waves and radio-over-fiber communications.

Abstract:

Introduction of services and applications that require higher bandwidth and augmented bitrates are dramatically increasing. Services such as live broadcasting and video streaming demands a larger bandwidth along with minimal latency and enhanced reliability. Thus, the mainstream of the future mobile communication is governed by how much bandwidth can be dedicated for such services and therefore how the capacity of the network can be improved to keep up with the growing demand for bandwidth. An effective method to increase the capacity of a network is to migrate to higher frequency bands. Millimeter-wave region has promising features that can accommodate higher capacities with working frequency in the 57-64 GHz (V-band) and 75-110 GHz (W-band) regions. Also, they offer enhanced security based on their narrow beam-width antenna and higher attenuation in the free space propagation making them only available across their designated coverage. Higher attenuation can be overcome by introduction of radio-over-fiber techniques in which millimeter-wave signal (radio frequency wave) can be transmitted through optical fiber to effectively increase the propagation distance compared to the free space propagation. Therefore, millimeter-wave radio over optical fiber can be an efficient method to transmit millimeter-wave signal to longer distances. In this paper, we propose a W-band optical code division multiplexing access (OCDMA) radio-over-fiber system generated by tandem dual electrode Mach Zehnder modulator (DE-MZM). To increase the capacity, we introduced the optical encoding and decoding with the help of superstructure fiber Bragg gratings (SSFBG). Also, to generate millimeter-wave signal, a tandem DE -MZM driven by signal generators operating at frequency range of less than 30 GHz have been used to decrease the overall cost and increase the stability of the system. The simulation results will be presented. The stability, capacity and reach of the system are improved while the cost and complexity are reduced.

S Saleem

COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Pakistan

Title: Spectroscopic analysis of calcite and dolomite marble using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

Time : 17:20-17:35

Speaker
Biography:

Sania Saleem is 22 years old. Is currently a student doing Masters of Science in Astronomy and Astrophysics from Institute of Space Technology, Islamabad. Completed Bachelors of Science in Physics from Comsats Institute of Information Technology .Interested in the field of laser physics and will prefer P.HD in the field of laser Physics. She has done project on Laser Induced Plasma Spectroscopy of commercially available Brass and is currently doing research work on Laser induced plasma spectroscopy of Nanomaterials and have submitted a research paper on Spectroscopic Analysis of Calcite and Dolomite Marble using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

Abstract:

Laser induced plasma spectroscopy is employed to study the effect of laser irradiance on the marble samples collected from North-West region of Pakistan and determine the elemental composition of these samples. A pulsed Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with fundamental and second harmonics in conjunction with the LIBS 2000 detection system were used to ablate the sample surface to produce the plasma and record the spectra of radiation emitted. The spectra show different elements including calcium, magnesium and sodium whereas lines emitted by Ca are dominating. The electron temperature of the plasma produced was determined by Boltzmann Plot Method and electron number density was determined from the broadening of spectral lines using Stark broadening. The plasma plume generated at the surface of the samples is studied by varying the laser energy from 15mJ to 40mj and distance along the plume length from the surface of the sample from 0.0mm to 1.0mm. It is observed that the electron temperature and number density are increased with increase of laser irradiance and decreased with the distance from the sample surface.

Marco Ornigotti

Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Germany

Title: Demonstration of local teleportation using classical entanglement

Time : 17:35-17:50

Speaker
Biography:

Marco Ornigotti has completed his PhD in Physics from the Polytechnic Institute of Milan in Italy and has done his Post-doctoral studies at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light from 2010-2013 in the Optics Theory Group led by Dr. Aiello. Currently, he is pursuing his second Postdoctoral degree from the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena. He is a well-recognized scientist in the community of Optical Beams and the Angular Momentum of Light, with more than 20 publications in reputed international journals.    

Abstract:

Teleportation is the most widely discussed application of the basic principles of quantum mechanics. Fundamentally, this process describes the transmission of information, which involves transport of neither matter nor energy. The implicit assumption, however, is that this scheme is of inherently nonlocal nature, and therefore exclusive to quantum systems. Here, we show that the concept can be readily generalized beyond the quantum realm. We present an optical implementation of the teleportation protocol solely based on classical entanglement between spatial and modal degrees of freedom, entirely independent of non-locality. Our findings could enable novel methods for distributing information between different transmission channels and may provide the means to leverage the advantages of both quantum and classical systems to create a robust hybrid communication infrastructure.

Speaker
Biography:

Chen Chen is a PhD candidate in Southeast University. Currently, she is working on the mechanism of intercellular communication between cancer derived exosomes and cells using single molecule localization based super resolution microscope.
 

Abstract:

Exosomes are cell-derived microvesicles presented in body fluids. The diameter of exosomes is around 30-100 nm. Exosomes play an important role in intercellular communications, exchanging of substances and diagnostic drug delivery. Recently, despite increasing scientific and clinical interest in exosomes, the moderate resolution of conventional optical microscopy limits the accurate localization and intracellular tracking of exosomes. Herein, we realize the application of single molecule localization based super resolution imaging technique (PALM/STORM) in the imaging and tracking of cancer derived exosomes. Firstly, successful extraction of cancer-derived exosomes from culture media are conducted and confirmed. Then labeling and imaging of exosomes membrane receptors are accomplished with photo-switchable probes. Moreover, simultaneous dual-color PALM imaging of the cancer derived exosomes is also presented. The most remarkable characteristic of this method is its excellent spatial resolution for exosomes observing at scales down to the nanometric level. Moreover, we demonstrate that cancer exosomes taken up by normal cells can be more precisely visualized through the presented PALM/STORM strategy. In addition, we also realize dual color PALM/STORM imaging of exosomes and lysosomes, which more vividly confirm the intracellular localization and accumulation of exosomes. The presented results indicate that PALM/STORM imaging is a powerful tool for the study of exosomes mediated cancer metastasis.

Speaker
Biography:

Peng Chen is a PhD candidate in Advanced Photonic Center of Southeast University. He is now working on SERS and Fluorescence based Optical Biosensor.

Abstract:

Currently, stimuli-responsive nanocarrier for dual-drug delivery is considered as a promising approach for highly effective therapy in cancer treatment. However, intracellular monitoring of the dual-drug release is still challenging. Here, we fabricate a pH and thermo dual-stimuli-responsive dual-drug nanocarrier based on gold-silver core-shell nanoparticles ([email protected]) functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). By using label-free surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescence techniques, we can monitor the dynamic process of drug release. In this nanocarrier a model drug indole is loaded inside the hollow tunnel of CNTs and released into cells by near-infrared (NIR) irradiation. Doxorubicin (DOX) is loaded on the surface of CNTs via π–π stacking and released by changing pH values. In the experiment, to investigate the intracellular traceable delivery performance of this nanocarrier, the dual-drug loaded nanocarrier was incubated with living HeLa cells. Experimental results indicated that the release of indole and DOX can be triggered by the photo-thermal effect and the acidic pH of lysosomes, respectively. Moreover, the combination of released indole and DOX exhibited significant cell-killing effects. The proposed functional CNTs act as an excellent near-infrared and pH-sensitive controllable delivery system for killing cells in application of cancer therapy.

Mingjia Shangguan

University of Science and Technology of China, China

Title: Upconversion Brillouin optical-time domain reflectometry
Speaker
Biography:

Mingjia Shangguan has received his BS degree from Jilin University of Architecture in 2012. He is pursuing his PhD in Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale at University of Science and Technology of China. His current research interests include Upconversion Technique and its application in Optical Fiber Sensors. 

Abstract:

A direct-detection Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry (BOTDR) using a photon-counting up-conversion detector (UCD) and an all-fiber structure Fabry–Perot scanning interferometer (FFP-SI) is demonstrated with shot-noise limited performance. In order to detect the weak spontaneous Brillouin backscatter signal efficiently, an ultra-low noise equivalent power of the photon-counting UPD is adopted, which up-converts the backscattering signal at 1548.1 nm to 863 nm, and then detected by a Si-APD. The final system efficiency of the UPD is 15% with a noise of 40 counts per second. By using high spectral resolution of the FFP-SI, the Brillouin spectra along a polarization maintain fiber (PMF) is analyzed in the optical frequency domain directly. In comparison with heterodyne BOTDR, direct-detection BOTDR has better EM compatibility and faster speed in data processing. In experiments, with peak input power of 20 dBm, temperature profile along a 9 km PMF is retrieved according to the Brillouin shift, with spatial/temporal resolution of 2 m/15 s. The precision is 0.7ºC at the leading end and 1.2ºC at the trailing end.

Speaker
Biography:

Li Jian received a Bachelor of Science degree from Harbin Engineering University in 2011 with major in Optical Information Science and Technology. From 2011 to 2014, he has worked at Foxconn Technology Group as a Photoelectric Equipment Development Engineer. Since 2014, he has been studying Master’s in Optics from Harbin Engineering University. His research interests are fiber optics, fiber sensor and long-period fiber grating. He has published two papers in the Science Citation Index and presented at a conference of Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. He has been invited as a Speaker for the 5th International Conference and Exhibition on Lasers, Optics and Photonics which will be held during November 28-30, 2016 in Atlanta, USA.

Abstract:

Long-period fiber grating (LPFGs) have attracted considerable attention recently for many applications in fiber sensors. The LPFGs can measure various physical parameters, such as, temperature, strain, refractive index and curvature. In our work, we provide a method to enhance the temperature sensitivity of LPFG. We propose a new type of LPFG, using the filament heating method for measurement of temperature. The LPFG is composed of many micro-tapers, which were fabricated using a GPX-3000 glass processing system (Vytran Corp). By using the Vytran Corp, the heating element was kept fixed and the translation stages with fiber clamps were moved in the same direction with different velocities. We can control the relative moving velocity of the translation stages and the power of heating filament to fabricate different geometric profiles micro-tapers. We used a vacuum coating machine (JS-1600). The thickness of gold thin film increased from 0 nm to 100 nm, and then increased to 200 nm. We tested the temperature sensitivities of the LPFG at three film thicknesses, respectively. The LPFG was placed in a temperature control chamber to test the temperature response. When the environmental temperature increased from 22 to 222ºC, the resonance wavelength had a red shift. The temperature sensitivity of the LPFG with no gold film is 48 pm/ºC. The temperature sensitivities of the 100 nm and 200 nm gold thin film-coated LPFGs are approximately 71 and 67 pm/ºC, respectively. We can enhance the temperature sensitivity of the LPFG by gold thin film-coated. The temperature sensitivity of the LPFG increases first and then decreases with the increase of gold film thickness, which is higher than the temperature sensitivity before coating.